The Krishna Story

Posted on Sep 11, 2013

Edited--2

Krishna’s story is an example of the power of the interdiction and rescue work that is taking place over and over again at each of our eleven border stations across Nepal each and every day. The tireless work of the K.I. Nepal border workers is an invaluable asset in the fight against human trafficking in Nepal, and your support helps enable their work.

Krishna is a 16 year old girl recently rescued at a border station. Her story begins in a rural mountain village in Nepal, a highly targeted area for traffickers, who capitalize upon the poverty and lack of awareness that often permeates these areas. Girls are often lured into trafficking, believing they are being recruited for a well-paying, respectable job in India, whereas the truth is that they are being captured for a life of sexual slavery.

In fact, Krishna has a sister who only weeks before had gone missing. A young man began calling Krishna on her cell phone, saying a friend gave him her number. He indicated that he knew her sister in India, and he offered to take her to meet up with her sister, being told that her sister was working at a very nice job.

Having been lured in, Krishna unsuspectingly left her rural village and traveled to Katmandu to meet this man at a bus station. Once she arrived, the young man did not come, but instead sent an older woman to capture her. Krishna was then taken to this woman’s home for ten days, during which time she was robbed and then sexually abused every day by a different man.

After the 10 days of abuse, Krishna was then taken to the border to cross over into India with the woman trafficker. While crossing, Krishna was told to walk ahead of her. It was while she was crossing the border that a K.I. Nepal border station worker saw her, recognized warning signs, and stopped both her and the woman who was with her. After an interview process, the truth came out and Krishna was rescued and sent to a safe home for recovery and restoration among other girls with similar stories. Her trafficker was sentenced to prison.

Krishna is now living in a K.I. Nepal safe home in a 6-month restoration program. During this time, she is learning sewing skills and making bracelets to sell. It is her desire and goal, once her training is complete, to return to her village a changed young woman, to start an ambassador club to prevent this crime from happening to other girls in her community.

Krishna’s personal story could have ended in great tragedy. If not for the border workers and their perceptive interdiction, Krishna would be in a brothel in India, living the life of a prostitute. We are grateful that this was not the end. In fact, her story is the story of 20,000+ girls each year who are rescued at Nepal/India borders by K.I. Nepal. With the addition of each border station, our ability to rescue even more girls is enhanced.

It is not known what has happened to Krishna’s sister. The devastating truth is that once girls are trafficked into India, the chances of their rescue dramatically decrease. This is why we must continue to advance our goal to END human trafficking in Nepal through prevention/awareness programs, micro enterprise opportunities, and border interdiction.